Compulsory Patriotism: Requiring the Pledge of Allegiance in school?

This article is scary. What the hell are people thinking?
It is horrific to me to that a state would even consider such a law.

David Moshman: Compulsory Patriotism: Requiring the Pledge of Allegiance.

This should horrify everyone, including our most patriotic citizens, if they truly love freedom and our constitution.

I have had several friends and students, some who were very patriotic, who don’t say the pledge of allegiance for a wide variety of reasons including: being atheist, being Christian, not believing in pledging to a symbol, not believing in blind allegiance to a government, to not believing in saying “justice for all” until that’s true

Forcing American citizens to participate in daily patriotic sayings is completley un-American, let alone a serious violation of their first amendment rights.

Rating doctors on healthy patients = teachers on state test scores

I read a comment in this article that compared evaluating teachers and doctors with the same “accountably” measures.

Teacher Development At Center Of New Center For American Progress Studies.

Rating doctors on how healthy their patients are is a perfect comparison since their patients many times come to them unhealthy in the first place.

It is the same thing as holding doctors accountabl e for how well their patients follow their medical advice or how many of their patients get cured of their ailments.

Doctors can’t force patients to lose weight or quit smoking any more than teachers can force some students to learn, or take those tests seriously or force their parents to support their child’s education (or change some of the factors that can affect low test scores like not speaking English, having a learning disability, or coming from a low socio-economic status).

School Districts Shortchange Low-Income Schools: Report

I am pleased that, as U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in the following article posted, “The facts are out there like they’ve never been before,” but these findings have been more than just “long suspected.”

School Districts Shortchange Low-Income Schools: Report.

In 1991, Jonathan Kozol detailed this in his book, Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools, that discusses the disparities in education between schools of different classes and races. It is based on his observations of various classrooms in the public school systems of East St. Louis, Chicago, New York City, Camden, Cincinnati, and Washington D.C.
His observations take place in both schools with the lowest per capita spending on students and the highest, ranging from just over $3,000 in Camden, New Jersey to a maximum expenditure of up to $15,000 in Great Neck, Long Island.
In his visits to these areas, Kozol illustrates the overcrowded, unsanitary and often understaffed environment that is lacking in basic tools and textbooks for teaching. He cites the large proportions of minorities in the areas with the lowest annual budgets, despite the higher taxation rate on individuals living in poverty within the school district.

This article states that, “Though Duncan highlighted the glaring disparities Wednesday, his administration has so far prioritized other issues — such as standards and innovation — over funding equity.”
These glaring disparities have always been known so, unfortunately, I doubt the report will alter priorities any more than Kozal’s findings did.